We take a look at the Amazon Echo

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Amazon Echo  

Is this the answer for you and your smart home?

The Amazon Echo is much more than a wireless speaker. In fact, playing music isn’t its number one feature.

The main theme for this device is the Amazon Alexa voice-assistant – and Amazon’s desire to be a permanent fixture within your home.

Alexa is designed to answer your every whim. Whether providing information such as the news and weather, adjusting you’re heating, or controlling your audio visual system, Amazon’s Echo speaker promises to do it all. After launching in the US last year, the Echo is now widely available. But does it deliver on its cloud computing promises and what about its wireless speaker?

Aesthetics

The Echo is a straightforward upright, cylindrical speaker, available in black or white, and while not exactly screaming top-end desirability, it looks good enough to merit a place in the average home. And it feels robust and solidly built for a £90 wireless speaker.  (The Alternative is the Echo Dot with no speaker at under £50)

Inside are seven microphones, alongside its voice technology to make sure your commands are heard, it also allows multiple speakers to work out which is nearer to you.

Also inside are a dual-band, dual-antenna Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and a couple of speaker drivers, a 6 cm woofer and a 5 cm tweeter.

Amazon is keen to emphasise that this is a first class speaker as well as a clever personal assistant, and it also promises 360-degree sound to give you plenty of flexibility in terms of placement.

Functionality

On top of the device you’ll find the ‘volume ring’ as well as the mute and action buttons. LED lights around the ring will show you when Alexa is listening, though you can mute the assistant entirely.

Getting started is simple. Plug in the speaker, download the Alexa app and you can be in command seconds later. Once up and running, it’s all about your voice.

But you do have the option of adjusting the volume on the Echo itself, while opening up the Alexa app will also give you some more control options. There’s also an optional Amazon Voice Remote for £20.

Operation

‘Alexa’ is the word used to activate the system, after which you can ask the speaker to play or pause music, read the news, weather, football scores. Both the success of these voice commands and the number of available services is crucial.

Alexa is learning all the time and Amazon is aiming to add new partners at an equally rapid rate.

Providing you speak clearly and use the systems recommended phrasing, Alexa is pretty impressive. A change in the tone of your voice can cause a little confusion, and while the Echo doesn’t find every singer songwriter we asked for, it has a fairly good strike rate.

Amazon makes a great play of how well Echo can hear its name, even in busy rooms or when there is more than one device.

But it’s not just about finding and listening to music; Alexa has many talents and skills, which are enabled through its various partnerships with content providers, including Sky Sports, The Guardian, Telegraph, National Rail, EDF Energy to name a few.

Getting locally based news and weather updates is easy enough, while some other skills require simple linking of accounts. Add an Uber account and you can ask Alexa to find a cab. A notification will arrive on your Uber app to confirm it’s on the way.

For some apps, the lack of a screen on the Echo means it may just be simpler to use your phone app.

However, the more compatible products you have, the more you will get out of Alexa, so it’s down to Amazon to keep adding ‘skills’ and partners.

Alexa’s other skill is connecting and controlling hardware, with Amazon aiming to give you complete control of your smart home.

We’re talking lights, switches and thermostats. Commanding the lights to turn on as you walk in the door is no longer the preserve of the rich and famous. This works.

On the Audio Visual side, custom installers already have Crestron support, allowing you to add voice control to a complete home cinema system.

Sonos and Amazon have also announced a deal to bring Alexa voice control to Sonos gear. We hope to see more Audio Visual brands getting involved.

We should also mention Amazon’s Echo Dot, a puck-sized unit that’s designed to be connected to your existing speakers, systems or even headphones.

The Echo Dot has the same Alexa voice assistant and skills, and looks like the top of an Echo speaker, complete with control buttons and volume ring – plus added volume up and down buttons. It also has seven microphones inside as on the featured Echo, so it can hear all your commands.

There are small speakers, so you can hear Alexa, but for music playback the aim is to connect to your existing system. It has a 3.5mm stereo audio output for this purpose, as well as wireless Bluetooth connectivity.

The Amazon Echo Dot could prove to be a clever addition to any array of existing audio and video products that would benefit from its voice control.

If you want the voice-controlled music experience, you will need to use Amazon Prime Music, Spotify or Tune In radio.

You can stream music from any source – as you would a standard Bluetooth speaker – but remember apps that aren’t associated won’t have voice control function.

Amazon wants to integrate Alexa with more devices, but for now Amazon Music is the default service, though that can be changed to Spotify. Whichever service you use, you can see the track playing on the Alexa app.

You can also ask Alexa what track is playing and other voice commands include playing by song, artist, genre or even playlist, and pause, shuffle and volume controls.

 The success rate isn’t quite 100 per cent. Less known bands with may take a few attempts to connect, but there are no issues getting commands to work from a reasonable distance.

But the Echo’s sound quality is a different story. Listening to music via Spotify, the Echo speaker plays it safe at both ends of the sound spectrum to avoid any unwanted harshness in the treble, but you don’t get a whole lot of bass depth either.

The speaker can play reasonably loud, but turn it up too high and you’re more likely to get the speaker itself shaking than any room-shaking bass.

The Echo is perfectly listen able, but for more discerning listeners, you can get a whole lot more detail from some of the alternatives in the market.

Of course, the Echo is much more than just a wireless speaker. If you simply want a Bluetooth speaker to listen to music, you should look for alternatives.

But by adding voice control to the equation, and bringing some futuristic functionality into play, the Echo is a satisfyingly clever little speaker.

The Echo demonstrates that Alexa is a slick, useful voice assistant, and one that should improve over time.

And while Alexa isn’t the only one – Apple’s Siri and Google’s Assistant spring to mind – it’s currently most likely to make a real impact throughout your home, and not just on your phone.

The more compatible apps, and devices you own, the more you will get out of the Echo. So we look forward to seeing more Audio Visual brands offering Alexa support.

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Smartech’s guide to comparing mobile phone tariffs

posted in: Infotech | 1

Our Guide to helping you compare mobile phone tariffs

Trying to work out what is the best mobile phone tariff for yourself can be a challenge. That’s why our Smartech guide is here to help.

According to a recent Ofcom-accredited survey, seventy five percent of Britons on pay monthly deals are spending too much on their mobile phone contract. With the total overspend standing at a massive 3 billion plus each year.

More alarming is the fact this is happening despite a massive range of contracts to choose from and comparison sites that help you track down the best deals.

So we will try to answer your question: “what’s contract is best for me?” and help you avoid paying over the top for something you don’t really need.

Finding the right mobile phone tariff

If you’re getting a new mobile phone then there are two major things you need to consider: the handset and the tariff itself.

If you don’t know what mobile phone you’re after, we’re in a great position to help you. Take a look at some recent  mobile phone reviews . Here you’ll be able to filter deals by length of contract and cost. You’ll also be able to sort them by data, calls or texts allowance, so that picking a deal is easy no matter what your priority is. But before you even start to look here, you need to know what you are truly using in terms of Data, minutes and texts. Why? Because most people use far more or less than they actually need, resulting in the wrong contract being purchased. So to help, we are introducing you to a clever little site called bill monitor.  It determines your usage so that you do not buy what you don’t need.

Pay monthly or pay as you go, it’s your choice. Choose wisely.

Monthly contract mobile phone tariffs allow you to make monthly payments and usually include a set amount of minute’s data and texts. Exceed those minutes, data or texts and you could end up with a nasty shock and a large additional bill.

Pay as you go tariffs allow you to top-up your phone with credit in advance and then use your phone until that pre-paid credit runs out. People who like to have complete control over what they are spending prefer to use pay as you go.

What can be included in a phone tariff?

There are many elements to a mobile phone tariff, from inclusive calls and texts to emailing and data applications.

Inclusive minutes

Every mobile phone tariff should offer a deal on inclusive minutes, the amount is usually dependent on how much you pay each month.

Compare mobile phone and free calls deals through a comparison website. There’s many to choose from.

Inclusive texts

Much like inclusive minutes, most mobile phone tariffs will offer a set number of inclusive texts. This often includes a number of free texts that can be bumped up with an add-on bundle.

Data refers to content or information that you can access over the internet from your mobile, such web pages, music or video calls.

If you are someone who likes to make the most of the advanced technology available on your phone, you should make sure your mobile phone tariff includes a data bundle. But remember if you have broadband in your house it is usually far cheaper to have your mobile automatically switch to this if your there. This can be a huge saving.

International

Calls from mobiles when you’re abroad can be very expensive. However, if you plan to use your mobile abroad a lot, you can sign-up to a mobile phone tariff that gives you a good rate on international roaming. For example 3 has a Tariff that allows you to use your contract like you were in your home country. See here

Contract lengths

Phone contract lengths vary considerably. If you’re the kind of person who upgrades your phone regularly, it might be a good idea to choose a 12-month contract. But there are other options. Purchase you own handset Sim free. Then buy a Sim card from the network of your choice. Many bundles start as low as £5 per calendar month. You do the Maths.

The main advantage of longer term contracts is that the length of the contract can sometimes mean you’ll pay a lower monthly premium.

You are also likely to pay a reduced sum for the handset itself or even pay nothing. But remember there is no such thing as Free. The price will have the purchase of the phone factored into the bundle.

We hope you found this useful. If you did, please like us on Facebook Thank you!

 

Coming shortly SIM Free Phones to give you the edge.

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